Monday, October 18, 2021
banner
Home /  NATION  /  Malicious campaign against Qatari Riyal

Malicious campaign against Qatari Riyal

Malicious campaign against Qatari Riyal


Malek Helali
Doha
THE malicious campaign that aimed to propagate a state of international distrust in the Qatari Riyal failed miserably after the British Central Bank reportedly warned the UAE related money exchange company Travelex not to interfere in political matters.
This came after the company that partners with the Emirati Center of Exchange directed its multiple branches across the world to stop dealing with the Qatari Riyal in a desperate attempt to manufacture propaganda against Qatar's economy.
Following the wide negative response that these unjustified measures got from British financial institutions that operate within clear legal frames and do not tolerate random overnight reactions, the company announced that it will resume dealing with the Qatari Riyal and claimed that the interruption was only momentary and circumstantial without further explanations.
Various news outlets from the blockade countries attempted to support the propaganda and were bound to fail and disappoint as they always do including 'AlArabiya' that tweeted fake news about three British Banks claiming that they stopped dealing with the Qatari Riyal. Soon after, the twitter community responded with tweets from the three banks' customer service officers confirming that Lloyds Bank, Halifax Bank and the Bank of Scotland still deal with the Qatari Riyal.
Qatari media figures and journalists widely retweeted a video from a Qatari citizen in London documenting the date on the 30th of June 2017 as she approaches a London-based money exchange company and asks whether they are still dealing with the Qatari Riyal. The footage clearly shows the exchange officer confirming that they do and showing her a stack of 100 Qatari Riyals.
Qatari figures including Abdullah Alwdhein and journalist Ilham Bader tweeted a news report from Qatar Television explaining the Travelex conspiracy and the British Central Bank response.

Pages