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Iran agrees to talks with world energy agency in nuclear dispute

Iran agrees to talks with world energy agency in nuclear dispute

dpa
Vienna/Berlin/Tehran
Following months of standstill in the dispute over its nuclear programme, Iran on Thursday agreed to talks between technical experts from the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and its representatives at the beginning of April.
“I’m clearly aiming at having a far more clear understanding of these issues by the summer, or before,” IAEA Director General Rafael Grossi said, referring to the monitoring of uranium particles.
In light of this development, Germany, France and Britain shelved a resolution critical of Iran intended to be brought before the IAEA’s board of governors.
Iran now had to demonstrate that it was “serious” about reinstating the 2015 Vienna nuclear deal, and to enter into dialogue with the United States, the Foreign Office in Berlin said.
Iranian Foreign Ministry spokesperson Saeed Khatibzadeh welcomed the decision: “Today’s step did not only enable continuation of the Iran-IAEA agreement but could also pave the way for the full and correct implementation of the JCPOA,” he said, referring to the formal name for the deal, the Joint Comprehensive Plan
of Action.
In his recent report on Iran, Grossi had showed strong concern about Iran’s refusal to provide information on the source of uranium particles.
The country had now agreed to a “focused and systematic” information process, he told journalists on Thursday, adding he hoped that the talks would move forward despite current Iranian restrictions on IAEA inspectors.
Germany, France and Britain as well as Russia and China have been trying to save the 2015 Vienna nuclear deal, which was supposed to prevent Iran from building a nuclear weapon. In return, sanctions on Tehran were to be lifted.
The US unilaterally withdrew from the nuclear deal under former president Donald Trump, dealing it a near-fatal blow. But there have been signs that it could be revived under the new administration of Joe Biden.

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