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Qatar’s largest interchange set to open partially by year-end

Qatar’s largest interchange set to open partially by year-end

Tribune News Network
Doha
The Public Works Auhority (Ashghal) has completed 72 percent works on Umm Lekhba Interchange -- also known as the Landmark intersection -- as part of the Sabah Al Ahmad Corridor project.
Various sections of the huge and vital interchange are scheduled to open by the end of 2019, while the remaining parts will open to traffic in stages during the period until the end of 2020, said Project Engineer Ali Ibrahim.
“The new interchange is the largest in Qatar with a length of 11 kilometres. It consists of four levels, a first in Qatar, and contains nine bridges to facilitate free traffic flow in all directions,” he said.
“The interchange can accommodate more than 20,000 vehicles per hour. Five out of the nine bridges have two lanes in one direction, while the remaining bridges have one lane in one direction. The interchange is the second highest interchange in Qatar after the interchange of Umm Bishr on the G-Ring Road, which is 36 metres high,” he added.
Umm Lekhba Interchange is considered to be the “northern gate of Doha” and a “distribution station” due to its strategic location. The interchange is located at an important spot where Al Shamal Road intersects with Doha Expressway, Al Markhiya Street and Sabah Al Ahmad Corridor.
Moreover, it is located in a densely populated area with vibrant commercial activity, several government offices, educational and health facilities, and commercial markets.
Once completed in the last quarter of 2020, the new interchange will significantly improve traffic to reduce the travel time by more than 70 percent. The bridges provide nine arteries to enable traffic in nine directions, in addition to facilitating free flow of traffic on Al Shamal Road as well as on the underpass of the old interchange linking Al Markhiya Street and Sabah Al Ahmad Corridor.
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